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Creating Scapular Control

It’s no secret how important the scapula is in the health of an overhead throwing athlete.  A stable scapula gives rise to a healthy, mobile, glenohumeral joint.  The scapula is to the shoulder, what the low back and pelvis are to the hip.  The human body is always stabilizing, and mobilizing at the same time to create motion.  Look no …

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The Forgotten Serratus Anterior

The serratus anterior may be most overlooked muscle in importance for shoulder health in the throwing athlete.  The lower trap (LT), serratus anterior (SA), and upper trap (UT) all work in conjunction to form a force couple known as upward rotation. Upward rotation is of huge importance for shoulder health when it comes to the overhead athlete.  If you can’t …

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Scapular Instability – 68% and 100%

Many times we often forget that the rotator cuff is not the end all be all with protecting pitchers and the throwing athlete. When the scapula is unable to stabilize, the shoulder, and rotator cuff is where problems occur.  Injuries often occur because of dysfunction above or below the injured segment.  When hamstrings are problems, glute activation is the first …

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Wall Angel Series

This video is on our wall angel series which might be the best scapular movement we do.  When done correctly, wall angels are one of the hardest exercises I’ve ever done.  Simply put they aren’t fun and they will make athletes sore in area’s they didn’t know exist.  We generally perform wall angels for 3-5 reps with controlled tempos as in a …

Scap Wall Slides for Throwing Athletes

Scap wall slides are great for the overhead athlete to activate the serratus anterior, a big time muscle for the overhead / throwing athlete. The serratus is an overlooked muscle in the grand scheme of shoulder function, but it might be on the of the most important for throwing athletes.  Right now, we’re perfomring scap wall slides as an activation warmup series prior to …

Activation Circuit

Ya, it’s been a while since my last post.  Life has been super busy lately.  Between fall ball officially ending and our true off-season training for baseball starting up, attending the ALDS, and World Series, as well as a few articles that you’ll see in the coming months, October was busy.  So with that behind me I can hopefully get …

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Shoulder Series and the Sleeper – Part II

We’ll continue our shoulder series with Part II today.  You can catch Part I here if you haven’t already. So with the athlete in question that we talked about in Part I the overwhelming question is what do we do with him now. The non glamorous answer is that he will crush soft tissue work, as well as be manually stretched.  We have to …

Rotator Cuff and the Towel

I’m no stranger to shoulder problems as I suffered through four shoulder surgeries during my time as an athlete.  Throughout all my rehab I always wondered what was the purpose of placing a towel under the arm during external rotation movements.  Well if you don’t know why you’re doing it either then you’re in the right place.  The towel actually increases …

Sleeper Stretch

Many of the athletes associated with throwing sports have experience with the sleeper stretch.  The sleeper stretch is for those with glenohumeral internal rotation deficits commonly known as GIRD.  This problem occurs most often in overhead throwing athletes.  Every time an athlete throws a ball there are huge distraction forces that occur at the release of the ball.  This repetitive stress causes …

The Scap Dip

A great movement for training scapular depression is the scap dip.  Scap depression is extremely important for shoulder health as well as stability.  Depression helps to keep the scapulae out of a rounded over, and pulled forward position.  The pec minor as well as the lower trapezius are responsible for scap depression.  Often, the lower trap is inhibited, and has been lengthened through …