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Medball Throw Series

Fall semester intern Colin Feikle gives a brief demo and description of 8 medball throws that we use with rotational sports at different times throughout the year. Generally, we prefer a 6-10# medball with 5-10 reps per side per throw. Side Throw – Focus: Hip rotation Front Throw – Focus: Hip extension into the wall Rebound Throw Focus: Weight transfer …

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Training Rotational Movement Patterns

I’ve been getting a lot of questions lately from high school coaches about our baseball training.  The number one thing is how to implement rotational work into their training.  Many small schools, and/or high schools don’t have access to cables, bands, or even med-balls to supplement their program with rotational training.  Even if they did have access to some of these tools, due …

Pallof Press

Quickly becoming one of my new favorite movements is the Cable Pallof Press.  We have used these with bands for years prior to having cable machines in our weight room, so there are other options for those of you who are without cables.  The movement trains anti-rotation of the the trunk.  Creating strength through anti-rotational exercises also produces strength in rotational exercises, …

EliteFTS Article

I had another article posted on EliteFTS.com this past week.  If you haven’t seen it you can check it out here.  Training Rotational Movement Patterns It concerns training rotational movement patterns in the weight room with beginnner / intermediate athletes.  I wrote the article because of all the questions I get on our rotational training movements when you don’t have bands, …

Rotational Movement Series

I’ve been getting a lot of questions lately from high school coaches about our baseball training.  The number one thing is how to implement rotational work into their training.  Most small schools and high schools don’t have access to cables / bands, or they have so many kids that due to time constraints they wouldn’t be feasible anyway.  I’ve uploaded …

Lumbar Spine Rotation

Lately, I’ve heard of many coaches that are against the theory that the lumbar spine was designed to be stable and resist rotation, citing that if the lumbar spine wasn’t meant to move that it would’ve been made with a solid bone instead of moving joints.   Most of you know that this is my philosophy when it comes to training the lumbar …