View Post

The Positions Block

The Foundation Program, which is detailed in the book Movement Over Maxes, is built around 3 blocks of development.  Those blocks are titled Positions, Patterning, and Performance.  Each has a specific place and purpose in the grand scheme of producing a well moving, strong athlete with a solid foundation for future development. The Positions Block is the first stage in …

View Post

Program Movement Not Muscles

Athletes are in the business of efficient movement, and the best are incredible at controlling their body. Coordinated movement doesn’t come from something as simple as purely building muscle size. Muscles mean little individually without the ability to synchronize movement in the appropriate skill. Athletes that can move well aren’t always the most muscular and the most muscular guys don’t …

View Post

Conditioning and Baseball

Conditioning for baseball players has long consisted of LSD, long, slow, distance work. While slow aerobic work has it benefits, I tend to disagree that it is a useful technique for baseball athletes which leads up to the inclusion of tempo runs. Tempo runs tend to fill the gap between speed, aerobic fitness, and recovery. What are tempo runs? Tempo …

View Post

Maxing without Maxing Part III

A question that has come across my desk a lot recently is how to calculate training weights without ever maxing an athlete. Or coaches ask how to monitor progress if max days are never a part of the program. For coaches that have already read my thoughts on max days in the former posts Where Have all the Max Days Gone  and Get It …

View Post

The Reverse Lunge: Building a Foundation for Athletes

Training the lower half of the body usually focuses on the big movements like squats and deadlifts. They dominate the landscape for most athletes, and rightly so. When you look at a pitching motion, the majority of the actual motion from leg pickup to release is performed through an interplay of single leg motion. That interplay could fill a novel, …

View Post

Autoregulation: The Pros and Cons When Training Athletes

Autoregulating training is a hot topic these days for coaches and athletes.  However, every situation presents itself differently.  At the heart of autoregulation these factors must be considered. Communication Trust Athlete’s Training Age Goals This article was written for simplifaster.com Autoregulation: The Pros and Cons When Training Athletes

View Post

BBA Podcast – All Things Baseball Performance

Michael Zweifel had me on his Building Better Athletes Podcast a while back alongside Dr. Stephen Osterer.  Dr. Osterer is a physical therapist / strength coach developing baseball athletes in Canada under the name baseballdevelopmentgroup.com.  We talked all things baseball and specifically got into some of the what, and why’s when it comes to screening athletes, the bench press, speed …

View Post

ABCA Podcast on Developing Athletes

Strength training for baseball players has certainly evolved over the years and for this week’s podcast, we connect with two of top strength coaches in college baseball in TCU’s Zach Dechant and Coastal Carolina’s Nick White. This episode is packed with tremendous insight as both Dechant and White speak about their growth as strength coaches and detail the specific plans …

View Post

Acute to Chronic Workload Ratios in Baseball

As the season fires up baseball athletes everywhere will be preparing their body for practices and games.  Understanding workloads and what an athlete is prepared for is incredibly important to keeping injuries at bay.  The acute to chronic ratio is nothing more than an athlete being prepared for what they’re about to do.  This article was written for elitebaseballperformance.com. Acute …

View Post

3 Guiding Principles to In-Season Training

Don’t Lose Motion Joint motion often gets overlooked as a part of training programs, especially in-season. Motion, often loses out to strength, and power development in the grand scheme of time but restoring tissue length may be just as important as anything to keep athletes on the field. It’s well known that pitchers can easily lose motion in their throwing …